I live in a household that supported John Gregg for governor last fall. That is except for our soon to be famous dog, Birdie. As far as I know, Birdie and Governor Holcomb never met. But the Holcomb campaign went after the canine demographic with their “Hounds for Holcomb” outreach. I laughed at it at the time. The most comforting news for those supporting John Gregg last year was that no matter the outcome of the election, Indiana was going to have a better governor. And we found out in a big way what that means this week. In one press conference, ...

I think I am gonna change things up around here after this brutal campaign season. These last few months, it seems I have spent too much time sitting at my kitchen counter reading and writing, then writing and reading some more.  Actually, I plan to keep doing that.  But I am planning on much of the tabloid style content that has been overwhelming my readers to fizzle out in the days and week's that follow November 8. That way, I can restake my claim as the edgy smart aleck who isn't afraid to write about the tough topics.  "Tough" means difficult in ...

Keith Cooper has served his time. Actually, he served someone else’s time in what appears to be a massive failing of Indiana’s criminal justice system. These things happen. The world, and the people living in it, are unquestionably imperfect after all. Cooper is the man who spent nearly ten years in Indiana prisons for a crime he didn't commit. He was convicted of armed robbery in 1997 and then released in 2006 as a result of a plea deal and is now living in Chicago. He is asking for a pardon of the erroneous conviction to have the felony removed from ...

Keith Cooper is becoming a household name around here these days.  It's ironic because all he wants from the State of Indiana is to have his name given back to him. Cooper is an African American convicted felon who lives in Chicago. He was released from the Indiana Department of Correction in 2006, after spending nearly ten years in prison, much of it at Wabash Valley Correctional Facility. He wants Gov. Mike Pence to issue a pardon for his conviction for an uncommon reason: he is innocent. In 1997, Cooper was convicted in Elkhart County of armed robbery and sentenced to 40 years in prison. ...