I got to visit an old friend this holiday weekend who is recovering from surgery.  He is an energetic guy with a long rehabilitation in front of him.  It is his energy that probably makes him feel caged right now, but at the same time, it is that energy that will ultimately lead him back to the freedom he currently misses. But even after his doctors say he is as good as new, he will still be an incurable and loyal Republican. During our visit, he asked me a good question. He pried, "what do you think it is that caused the ...

To someone from out of town, Indianapolis may have appeared to have two distinctly different personalities on Saturday. WRTV, Indy’s ABC affiliate, reported that 120,000 people lined the streets of downtown for the Cadillac Barbie Indiana Pride Parade. Nearly 200 entries participated in it, featuring at least seventeen churches. The event’s purpose is to support, educate, honor and celebrate the diversity of the Indianapolis lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and straight communities. Think of how this event has changed since it began thirty years ago, and how exciting this must be for all of the friends and families who have been involved ...

Last Tuesday's New York primary pushed the leaders in the race for presidential nominations of the two major parties closer to the finish line.  The "process" for both parties has been under fire to varying degrees this year. As the campaigns arrive in Indiana this week, I feel the need to point out some basic parts of the American process for selecting its executive. The process we are in right now is the nominating process.  Not the election.  Political parties nominate.  And those parties create their own rules for their own processes.  It's a lesson that was available to Donald Trump ...

This morning I read a column in the Indianapolis Business Journal written by Marshawn Wolley.  He is an impressive young man who I was lucky enough to meet and work with on an issue this winter.  His column serves as a precursor to April 4, a famous date in American history, and of particular notoriety in Indianapolis. April 4, 1968 is the day Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in Memphis.  That evening in Indianapolis, Bobby Kennedy, while on a presidential campaign stop, made the announcement of Dr. King's death in his famous speech calling out for peace.  Indianapolis gave ...